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Celestial Events 2022

Many events will be happening during 2022.  Check them out, curtesy of Space.com.

Jan. 4: Happy perihelion day! Earth is closest to the sun today. 

Jan. 5: Conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. The waxing crescent moon will swing about 4.5 degrees to the south of Jupiter in the evening sky.

Jan. 7: Mercury reaches its greatest eastern elongation from the sun in its current evening apparition. The innermost planet will be shining brightly at magnitude -0.6. Catch the elusive planet above the western horizon shortly after sunset. It will reach its highest altitude in the evening sky on Jan. 11.

Jan. 17: The full moon of January, known as the Wolf Moon, arrives at 6:48 p.m. EST (2348 GMT).

Jan. 29: Conjunction of the moon and Mars. The waning crescent moon will pass just 2.4 degrees north of the Red Planet. Look for the pair in the dawn sky in the constellation Sagittarius. 

Feb. 1: The new moon arrives at 12:46 a.m. EST (0546 GMT).

Feb. 12: Conjunction of Venus and Mars. The two planets will be about 6.5 degrees apart in the dawn sky. Look for the pair in the constellation Sagittarius.

Feb. 16: The full moon of February, known as the Snow Moon, arrives at 11:56 a.m. EST (1656 GMT).

Feb. 27: The moon, Mars and Venus will align in the early morning sky. Look for the trio in the constellation Sagittarius before sunrise.

March 2: The new moon arrives at 12:34 p.m. EST (1734 GMT).

March 12: Conjunction of Venus and Mars. The two planets will be about 4 degrees apart in the dawn sky. Look for the pair in the constellation Capricornus before sunrise.

March 18: The full moon of March, known as the Worm Moon, arrives at 3:18 a.m. EDT (0718 GMT). 

March 20: Vernal equinox. Today marks the first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of fall in the Southern Hemisphere.

March 27-29: MarsVenus and Saturn will form a small triangle in the predawn sky near the waning crescent moon. Look for the trio in the constellation Capricornus before sunrise.

April 1: The new moon arrives at 2:24 a.m. EDT (0546 GMT).

April 4: Saturn and Mars will make a close approach in the dawn sky, coming within less than one-third of a degree of one another. Look for the pair in the constellation Capricornus before sunrise.

April 21-22: The Lyrid meteor shower peaks.

April 16: The full moon of April, known as the Pink Moon, arrives at 2:55 p.m. EDT (1855 GMT).

April 30: partial solar eclipse will be visible from southern South America, parts of Antarctica, and over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. This eclipse coincides with the second new moon of April, also known as a Black Moon.

May 4-5: The Eta Aquarid meteor shower peaks. 

May 16: The full moon of May, known as the Flower Moon, arrives at 12:14 a.m. EDT (0414 GMT).

May 16-17: A total lunar eclipse, also known as a Blood Moon, will be visible from North and South America, Europe, Africa and parts of Asia.

May 29: Jupiter and Mars will make a close approach in the dawn sky and will be just over one-half degree apart. While they won't be close enough to glimpse together by telescope, the planets will be visible together with the naked eye or in a pair of binoculars. 

May 30: The new moon arrives at 7:30 a.m. EDT (1230 GMT).

June 14: The full moon of June, known as the Strawberry Moon, arrives at 7:52 a.m. EDT (1152 GMT). It will also be the first "supermoon" of the year.

June 21: Solstice. Today marks the first day of summer in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter in the Southern Hemisphere. 

June 28: The new moon arrives at 10:52 p.m. EDT (0252 June 29 GMT).

July 13: The full moon of July, known as the Buck Moon, arrives at 2:38 p.m. EDT (1838 GMT). It will also be the biggest "supermoon" of the year.

July 28: The new moon arrives at 1:54 p.m. EDT (1754 GMT).

Aug. 11: The full moon of August, known as the Sturgeon Moon, arrives at 9:36 p.m. EDT (0136 Aug. 12 GMT).

Aug. 11-12: The Perseid meteor shower peaks.

Aug. 27: The new moon arrives at 4:17 a.m. EDT (0817 GMT). 

Sept. 10: The full moon of September, known as the Harvest Moon, arrives at 5:59 a.m. EDT (0959 GMT).

Sept. 23: Autumnal equinox. Today marks the first day of fall in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring in the Southern Hemisphere.

Sept. 25: The new moon arrives at 5:54 p.m. EDT (2154 GMT).

Oct. 8: The Draconid meteor shower, which is active Oct. 6-10, will peak overnight.

Oct. 9: The full moon of October, known as the Hunter's Moon, arrives at 4:55 p.m. EDT (2055 GMT).

Oct. 20-21: The annual Orionid meteor shower, which is active all month long, peaks overnight. 

Oct. 25: The new moon arrives at 6:48 a.m. EDT (1048 GMT).

Oct. 25: A partial solar eclipse will be visible from Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East and western parts of Asia.

Nov. 4-5: The annual South Taurid meteor shower peaks overnight. 

Nov. 7-8: A partial lunar eclipse will be visible from Asia, Australia, North America, parts of northern and eastern Europe and South America.

Nov. 8: The full moon of November, known as the Beaver Moon, arrives at 6:02 a.m. EST (1102 GMT). 

Nov. 11-12: The annual North Taurid meteor shower peaks overnight.

Nov. 17-18: One of the most anticipated meteor showers of the year, the Leonid meteor shower peaks overnight. 

Nov. 23: The new moon arrives at 5:57 p.m. EST (2257 GMT).

Dec. 7: The full moon of December, known as the Cold Moon, arrives at 11:08 p.m. EST (0408 Dec. 8 GMT).

Dec. 13-14: The annual Geminid meteor shower, one of the best meteor showers of the year, peaks overnight.

Dec. 21: Solstice. Today marks the first day of winter in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer in the Southern Hemisphere.

Dec. 21-22: The annual Ursid meteor shower peaks overnight.

Dec. 23: The new moon arrives at 5:16 a.m. EDT (0916 GMT).

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